Social Units

On the previous page, you were introduced to the physical units of Janus Metrics. This page will cover the social units.

Monetary Value

Janus Metrics has a standard name for units of value, in other words for monetary currencies: the  Merit [Me]. Which currency you mean depends on the context, or you can specify it with a preceding adjective, like Euro-.

Points

Janus Metrics also has a standard name for arbitrary units of comparison, like points in a sport, grades in school or stars in a rating: the  Valit [Va]. The scale is normally 0-100%, written with the decade sign.

Absolute time

The Chronit measures elapsed time, the time between two moments. In contrast, absolute time identifies a particular moment. The simplest way to express absolute time is to measure the elapsed time since a reference moment.

Janus Metrics does this, and the result is called the Janus Clock. The reference moment is called the Epoch, and it is arbitrarily set to midnight UTC the morning of 22 December 1957, 2 hours and 49 minutes before the winter solstice during which Sputnik was in orbit, representing the beginning of the Space Age. Other reference moments could have been chosen, for example the first human flight (Montgolfier, 1783), first radio (Marconi, 1896), first powered heavier-than-air human flight (Wright, 1903), first controlled fission (Fermi, 1942), first human spaceflight (Gagarin, 1961), first interplanetary spaceflight (Mariner, 1962), or first human lunar landing (Apollo 11, 1969), but Sputnik is recent, optimistic, inoffensive, and significant.

The Janus Clock measures time elapsed since the Epoch in units called Orit [Or]: 1 Orit means 1 Chronit since the Epoch.

Current local date and time:
Current universal time:
It's now


The Date

Dates are also reckoned from the Epoch: the date is the number of days since the Epoch, not counting any fraction of the current day. In other words, each date is numbered by its beginning, not its end. Dates have nothing to do with years, months, weeks or days of the week.

The Janus Date is a unit called the  Dattit [Da]. Da0 was 22dec1957AD.

Today is


Cyclical time

An Orit measures absolute time, but there is another kind of time important to us: the cyclical time which provides the social pattern in which we live our lives. Two cycles in particular are very important to us: the year and the day.

The Year

Janus also counts years from the Epoch. Years start on the southern solstice (the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere), which is usually 21-22 December. The Janus unit for year is the  Annit [An], from the Latin word for year, annus. The year that began on 22 December 1957 CE was Janus Year 0.

The year is


Note that Dattit and Annit measure completed days and years, excluding the already-past part of the current day or year. At midnight UTC at the end of 21 December of this year, the year will be complete, and the Annit will increment by 1. That's different from how we now look at it, where refers to today as part of the year in progress.

The Day

The Janus day is a social unit that enables people to coordinate their activities. It bears a close relationship with the astronomical day - the period in which the sun seems to circle overhead, but it's not necessarily exactly the same, any more than the current system.

Like the current day, the Janus day is anchored at noon, the moment when the sun is directly above us. Times of day are then expressed in units called  Solit [So]: 1 Solit means 1 Chronit since noon. Morning times (between midnight and noon) use negative Solit. Note that a Janus day isn't an even number of Solit, and it doesn't matter. In fact, the Janus day is not 24 hours - its length may vary, and in fact nothing prevents one day from overlapping with the next: you may be stumbling out of the disco at 17pm on Friday as the dedicated sport fishermen are headed out at -7am on Saturday morning.

Like the current system, the day is local : you share it with the other people in your city. But people in other cities may use different local time, without the need for time zones. For example, the French government may publish a local time standard based on solar noon at the zero point in front of Notre Dame cathedral. Or, if they wish to observe daylight savings time, they may advance the local time by a few minutes every day so that sunrise always occurs at the same local time of day. A Muslim standard might prefer to keep sunset constant. In any case, the standard is published in advance as a formula which, for a given date in a given location, produces the offset between absolute time and local time, between Orits and Solits.

But there is no guarantee that Paris time is the same as Barcelona time, even though Paris is directly north of Barcelona. Nor is Paris always going to be 1 hour ahead of London time - your watch, clock, computer or phone needs to know the formula for each standard, or capture a broadcast of the local time. When, for example, a World Cup match is being played in Rio, the website would just publish the absolute time (already easier than date + local time), and everyone would use their watch to know when that is in their local time.

The local time is


The Day of the Year

The Janus year is divided into 12 Months of 30 days each, which happen to line up well with the months of the tropical Zodiac. Each of these months is divided into 5 Weeks of 6 days each, for a total of 60 weeks per year. In addition, there are four Holidays every year that fall at the end of every season:

The days of the current seven-day week are named after planets, in turn named after gods. For example, Tuesday is named after the war god Tiw (Norse Tír), the Germanic equivalent of the Roman war god Mars, after whom the planet is named. Janus continues this tradition, but with new names so that there's no confusion. As days of the six-day week, we use the Greek names for the six Olympian children of Zeus:

PlanetsEnglishItalianHindiJanusAbbreviations
The Sun & other starsSunday"soledi"RavivārApollo ς ☉
The Moon & other moons MondaylunediSomavārArtemis ε ☽
Mars & UranusTuesdaymartediMangalavārAres τ ♂
Mercury & SaturnWednesdaymercolediBudhavārHermes 1 ☿
Jupiter & Earth ThursdaygiovediGuruvārAthena 3 ⚴
Venus & NeptuneFridayvenerdiShukravārAphrodite 5 ♀

They correspond pretty well to our current day names, but there is no Saturday - we took the Sabbath off! And we asked Athena to represent her father.

The weeks have also been given names based on the four elements, adding soil or sand (earth) as intermediate between solid and liquid:
Stone Earth Water Air Fire
(or Metal) (or Wood) (or Sea) (or Wind)
 η 🝔¹  ζ 🜃  0 🜄  2 🜁  4 🜂
¹The alchemical symbol for stone is not in Unicode, so we use the symbol for soap.

The month, week and day of the week are abbreviated using digits (as shown above), although they can't be used for arithmetic. Along with a fourth digit representing the element (discussed below), these numbers spell a day-of-the-year unit, the Hemerit , abbreviated He (from the Greek word for day). The months are numbered from  ϑ -6 to  6, skipping  0. Weeks have even numbers, while the days of the week have odd numbers. By convention, the holidays have Month 0, Week 0 and Element 0, but they each have a different day of the week, as shown below.

Today is



Repetitive Schedules

In the Janus calendar, there are no weekends : stores, schools, trains, etc. all have a single schedule (except for the holidays). But each individual has his own repetitive schedule which includes days off during the week, vacations, and regular dates like classes, meetings or bowling night. For instance, you might have a class that meets every Wednesday night, i.e .once every six days.

But the Janus calendar also has a monthly sequence designed to interleave the working schedules of five colleagues, assuming each works one-fifth of his time (219 eight-hour days a year). That's the equivalent of 41 non-weekend days off a year, more time off than most Americans but a little less than the French. On this schedule, three of the five would work every day.

Here's how it works : the five weeks of each month are already assigned to elements. The schedule below also assigns each day of the month to an element. Finally, each person is associated with one of the five elements, and he gets the day off whenever either the week or the day is his element. A business, if it closes, might close every day of one element, but not that element's week.

Week  Apollo ς  Artemis ε  Ares τ  Hermes 1  Athena 3  Aphrodite 5
 Stoneweek η Waterday Airday Earthday Fireday Waterday Airday
 Earthweek ζ Airday Fireday Waterday Stoneday Airday Fireday
 Waterweek 0 Fireday Stoneday Airday Earthday Fireday Stoneday
 Airweek 2 Stoneday Earthday Fireday Waterday Stoneday Earthday
 Fireweek 4 Earthday Waterday Stoneday Airday Earthday Waterday

If you examine this calendar, you'll see that everybody has a full week of vacation every month. In between vacations, they work three days on and one day off, with an extra day off in the middle of the month. There are always three people working, and if the three of you are working in shifts to cover the entire 24-hour day, you would work the morning shift for your first two 3-day sets, the afternoon shift for the next two, and the night shift for the last two. The schedules are all identical (and symmetrical), so no element is better than another. The same braid pattern repeats every month. Of course, everybody will also work some of the holidays if their workplace isn't closed.

We call the single days off a "soloday", the double days off a "duoday", and a set of three working days a "trioday".

Dual Calendar

Here is a dual calendar (for non-leap years). For leap years, February 29 is Heηζ1η, and every date afterwards in the current calendar corresponds to the Janus date of the previous day. For example, to see what Janus day it is on July 4th of a leap year, look up July 3rd below.

Month Week  Day ς
Apollo
 Day ε
Artemis
 Day τ
Ares
 Day 1
Hermes
 Day 3
Athena
 Day 5
Aphrodite
 Month ϑ
Capricorn
 Week η
Stoneweek
December 22 December 23 December 24 December 25 December 26 December 27
 Week ζ
Earthweek
December 28 December 29 December 30 December 31 January 1 January 2
 Week 0
Waterweek
January 3 January 4 January 5 January 6 January 7 January 8
 Week 2
Airweek
January 9 January 10 January 11 January 12 January 13 January 14
 Week 4
Fireweek
January 15 January 16 January 17 January 18 January 19 January 20
 Month ς
Aquarius
 Week η
Stoneweek
January 21 January 22 January 23 January 24 January 25 January 26
 Week ζ
Earthweek
January 27 January 28 January 29 January 30 January 31 February 1
 Week 0
Waterweek
February 2 February 3 February 4 February 5 February 6 February 7
 Week 2
Airweek
February 8 February 9 February 10 February 11 February 12 February 13
 Week 4
Fireweek
February 14 February 15 February 16 February 17 February 18 February 19
 Month η
Pisces
 Week η
Stoneweek
February 20 February 21 February 22 February 23 February 24 February 25
 Week ζ
Earthweek
February 26 February 27 February 28 March 1 March 2 March 3
 Week 0
Waterweek
March 4 March 5 March 6 March 7 March 8 March 9
 Week 2
Airweek
March 10 March 11 March 12 March 13 March 14 March 15
 Week 4
Fireweek
March 16 March 17 March 18 March 19 March 20 March 21
Spring Easter March 22
 Month ε
Aries
 Week η
Stoneweek
March 23 March 24 March 25 March 26 March 27 March 28
 Week ζ
Earthweek
March 29 March 30 March 31 April 1 April 2 April 3
 Week 0
Waterweek
April 4 April 5 April 6 April 7 April 8 April 9
 Week 2
Airweek
April 10 April 11 April 12 April 13 April 14 April 15
 Week 4
Fireweek
April 16 April 17 April 18 April 19 April 20 April 21
 Month ζ
Taurus
 Week η
Stoneweek
April 22 April 23 April 24 April 25 April 26 April 27
 Week ζ
Earthweek
April 28 April 29 April 30 May 1 May 2 May 3
 Week 0
Waterweek
May 4 May 5 May 6 May 7 May 8 May 9
 Week 2
Airweek
May 10 May 11 May 12 May 13 May 14 May 15
 Week 4
Fireweek
May 16 May 17 May 18 May 19 May 20 May 21
 Month τ
Gemini
 Week η
Stoneweek
May 22 May 23 May 24 May 25 May 26 May 27
 Week ζ
Earthweek
May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 June 1 June 2
 Week 0
Waterweek
June 3 June 4 June 5 June 6 June 7 June 8
 Week 2
Airweek
June 9 June 10 June 11 June 12 June 13 June 14
 Week 4
Fireweek
June 15 June 16 June 17 June 18 June 19 June 20
Summer Midyear June 21 June 22
 Month 1
Cancer
 Week η
Stoneweek
June 23 June 24 June 25 June 26 June 27 June 28
 Week ζ
Earthweek
June 29 June 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4
 Week 0
Waterweek
July 5 July 6 July 7 July 8 July 9 July 10
 Week 2
Airweek
July 11 July 12 July 13 July 14 July 15 July 16
 Week 4
Fireweek
July 17 July 18 July 19 July 20 July 21 July 22
 Month 2
Leo
 Week η
Stoneweek
July 23 July 24 July 25 July 26 July 27 July 28
 Week ζ
Earthweek
July 29 July 30 July 31 August 1 August 2 August 3
 Week 0
Waterweek
August 4 August 5 August 6 August 7 August 8 August 9
 Week 2
Airweek
August 10 August 11 August 12 August 13 August 14 August 15
 Week 4
Fireweek
August 16 August 17 August 18 August 19 August 20 August 21
 Month 3
Virgo
 Week η
Stoneweek
August 22 August 23 August 24 August 25 August 26 August 27
 Week ζ
Earthweek
August 28 August 29 August 30 August 31 September 1 September 2
 Week 0
Waterweek
September 3 September 4 September 5 September 6 September 7 September 8
 Week 2
Airweek
September 9 September 10 September 11 September 12 September 13 September 14
 Week 4
Fireweek
September 15 September 16 September 17 September 18 September 19 September 20
Autumn Harfest September 21
 Month 4
Libra
 Week η
Stoneweek
September 22 September 23 September 24 September 25 September 26 September 27
 Week ζ
Earthweek
September 28 September 29 September 30 October 1 October 2 October 3
 Week 0
Waterweek
October 4 October 5 October 6 October 7 October 8 October 9
 Week 2
Airweek
October 10 October 11 October 12 October 13 October 14 October 15
 Week 4
Fireweek
October 16 October 17 October 18 October 19 October 20 October 21
 Month 5
Scorpio
 Week η
Stoneweek
October 22 October 23 October 24 October 25 October 26 October 27
 Week ζ
Earthweek
October 28 October 29 October 30 October 31 November 1 November 2
 Week 0
Waterweek
November 3 November 4 November 5 November 6 November 7 November 8
 Week 2
Airweek
November 9 November 10 November 11 November 12 November 13 November 14
 Week 4
Fireweek
November 15 November 16 November 17 November 18 November 19 November 20
 Month 6
Sagittarius
 Week η
Stoneweek
November 21 November 22 November 23 November 24 November 25 November 26
 Week ζ
Earthweek
November 27 November 28 November 29 November 30 December 1 December 2
 Week 0
Waterweek
December 3 December 4 December 5 December 6 December 7 December 8
 Week 2
Airweek
December 9 December 10 December 11 December 12 December 13 December 14
 Week 4
Fireweek
December 15 December 16 December 17 December 18 December 19 December 20
Winter Yearend December 21 February 29
Month Week  Day ς
Apollo
 Day ε
Artemis
 Day τ
Ares
 Day 1
Hermes
 Day 3
Athena
 Day 5
Aphrodite

Latitude and Longitude

Position on the surface of the Earth (or another planet) is measured by longitude west and latitude north of a reference point in the Gulf of Guinea where the prime meridian crosses the equator. East and south use negative numbers. When written together, the combination uses the same notation as complex numbers, with latitude south using the letter j in romanization for negative imaginary coordinates.

Both longitude and latitude are measured in turns, or Torit, so that all values are fractions. This combination is called a  Lokit [Lo]. For example, the lighthouse at Pointe des Almadies, Senegal - the westernmost point in Africa - is at Lo04873i04095.

Compass Directions

Headings and bearings are expressed as angles using a unit called an  Azimit [Az]. An Azimit of °3 means 3/12 of a full turn right (clockwise) from due west, in other words, north. Likewise, Az°6 is east, and Az°ε is south.

Recap

AnnitAnabsolute year
AzimitAzdirection
DattitDaabsolute date
HemeritHeday of the year
LokitLolocation
MeritMevalue
OritOrabsolute time
SolitSotime of day
ValitVacomparison


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